Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost, October 28, 2018, Proper 25, Year B

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Job 42:1-6, 10-17)

Realizing his inadequacy in comparison to the Lord, Job admits his presumption and repents. The Lord more than restores his wealth, friends, and children as comfort for his suffering. His beautiful daughters inherit with his sons when he dies in ripe old age.

 Psalm (34:1-8, [19-22])

The Psalmist calls for the Lord to be blessed and exalted because he will always save those who look to him. His angels protect them, and, though the righteous one goes through affliction, none of his bones will be broken. Evil and death await the wicked.

Second Reading (Hebrews 7:23-28)

The writer of Hebrews details the superiority of Jesus’ forever high priesthood. For all time he is able to save those who approach God through him. His sacrifice of himself, as the promised Son made perfect forever, is once for all, and for all time.

Gospel (Mark 10:46-52)

The disciples try to keep blind Bartimaeus from bothering Jesus, but he hears him anyway and calls him over. Naturally the man wants to see, and Jesus honours his faith by restoring his sight. As a result of his healing he immediately follows Jesus.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • We are not promised a life free from trouble, but we are promised that God will see us through to deliverance
  • God is in the restoration business for those who approach him
  • Whatever losses we endure are eclipsed by far by what we receive when we remain faithful to Jesus
  • Jesus is not aloof from our need, being himself human

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Jeremiah 31:7-9)

As a result of their pleas, the Lord promises to bring the remnant of his people back to the Land. Although now scattered widely in exile, as their Father he will lead them all straight home without stumbling, including the blind, the lame and the pregnant.

Psalm (126)

Reflecting on those blessed occasions when the Lord had restored Israel’s fortunes in the past, the Psalmist calls upon him once again to act in like manner. Although his people have sown with tears he is confident that they shall reap in joy under the Lord’s hand.

Second Reading (Hebrews 7:23-28)

The writer of Hebrews details the superiority of Jesus’ forever high priesthood. For all time he is able to save those who approach God through him. His sacrifice of himself, as the promised Son made perfect forever, is once for all, and for all time.

Gospel (Mark 10:46-52)

The disciples try to keep blind Bartimaeus from bothering Jesus, but he hears him anyway and calls him over. Naturally the man wants to see, and Jesus honours his faith by restoring his sight. As a result of his healing he immediately follows Jesus.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • We are not promised a life free from trouble, but we are promised that God will see us through to deliverance
  • Those who call out to the Lord may be sure that he will respond
  • God is in the restoration business for those who approach him
  • Jesus is not aloof from our need, being himself human

 

 

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