Readings for October 30, 2016 Year C All Saints Day (Transferred)/Proper 26 (31)

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

All Saints Day (Transferred)

[See below for Year C Proper 26 (31)]

First Reading and Psalm

  • Daniel 7:1-3, 15-18
  • Psalm 149

Second Reading

  • Ephesians 1:11-23

Gospel

  • Luke 6:20-31

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Daniel is given a vision of four great kings or kingdoms that shall arise out of the earth. Each is visualized as a horrific “beast”, striking terror in the heart of the prophet. In spite of this threatening scenario, Daniel is assured that the kingdom will ultimately belong forever to the holy ones of God. The Psalm calls for praise to YAHWEH because he gives glorious victory to lowly Israel, setting it over the kings and nobles of the nations. Paul writes of the glorious inheritance we now have in Christ, rooted in the power exhibited in his resurrection and demonstrated in his being designated head over all things for us. While he is our head, we are his body and share in his fullness. In Luke’s version of the Beatitudes it is clear that things in the kingdom of God will be upside down from our normal experience. The lowly will be made great and vice versa. In the meantime we are called to embody a kind of upside down kingdom way of life, loving our enemies and treating them as we ourselves desire to be treated.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Daniel is given a vision of four great kings or kingdoms that shall arise out of the earth. Each is visualized as a horrific “beast”, striking terror in the heart of the prophet. In spite of this threatening scenario, Daniel is assured that the kingdom will ultimately belong forever to the holy ones of God.

Psalm

The Psalm calls for praise to YAHWEH because he gives glorious victory to lowly Israel, setting it over the kings and nobles of the nations.

New Testament

Paul writes of the glorious inheritance we now have in Christ, rooted in the power exhibited in his resurrection and demonstrated in his being designated head over all things for us. While he is our head, we are his body and share in his fullness.

Gospel

In Luke’s version of the Beatitudes it is clear that things in the kingdom of God will be upside down from our normal experience. The lowly will be made great and vice versa. In the meantime we are called to embody a kind of upside down kingdom way of life, loving our enemies and treating them as we ourselves desire to be treated.

Year C Proper 26 (31)

First Reading and Psalm

  • Habakkuk 1:1-4; 2:1-4
  • Psalm 119:137-144

Alternative First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 1:10-18
  • Psalm 32:1-7

Second Reading

  • 2 Thessalonians 1:1-4, 11-12

Gospel

  • Luke 19:1-10

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Crying out for YAHWEH to end his silence in the midst of Judah’s destruction, the prophet Habakkuk decides simply to listen for the divine word. He is assured both of a coming “end” for which he is to wait and also that it is through such faithfulness that the righteous will live. The Psalmist, although he is in the midst of serious trouble, exults in the life-giving quality of God’s word at every level of existence and pleads for fuller understanding. Paul praises the Thessalonians who are steadfast in the midst of suffering and persecution. Indeed, they are growing in faith and love through the power of God, bringing glory to the Lord Jesus. St. Luke tells the story of Zacchaeus who, in the midst of his sin, had a passion to see Jesus in spite of the obscuring throng. Up in the tree above the crowd he hears Jesus’ word and his life is transformed as he experiences the new life of God’s salvation.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Crying out for YAHWEH to end his silence in the midst of Judah’s destruction, the prophet Habakkuk decides simply to listen for the divine word. He is assured both of a coming “end” for which he is to wait and also that it is through such faithfulness that the righteous will live.

Psalm

The Psalmist, although he is in the midst of serious trouble, exults in the life-giving quality of God’s word at every level of existence and pleads for fuller understanding.

New Testament

Paul praises the Thessalonians who are steadfast in the midst of suffering and persecution. Indeed, they are growing in faith and love through the power of God, bringing glory to the Lord Jesus.

Gospel

St. Luke tells the story of Zacchaeus who, in the midst of his sin, had a passion to see Jesus in spite of the obscuring throng. Up in the tree above the crowd he hears Jesus’ word and his life is transformed as he experiences the new life of God’s salvation.

Based on the Alternative Readings

The prophet Isaiah compares the sin of Judah to that of Sodom and Gomorrah and calls the nation to right living as well as right religion. He offers the promise that, if the nation repents, its sins will be forgiven. The Psalmist rejoices in sins forgiven and even in the difficult times that inspired true repentance. YAHWEH is a hiding place in times of trouble for those who will look to him. Paul praises the Thessalonians who are steadfast in the midst of suffering and persecution. Indeed, they are growing in faith and love through the power of God, bringing glory to the Lord Jesus. St. Luke tells the story of Zacchaeus who, in the midst of his sin, had a passion to see Jesus in spite of the obscuring throng. Up in the tree above the crowd he hears Jesus’ word and his life is transformed as he experiences the new life of God’s salvation.

As Introductions

Old Testament

The prophet Isaiah compares the sin of Judah to that of Sodom and Gomorrah and calls the nation to right living as well as right religion. He offers the promise that, if the nation repents, its sins will be forgiven.

Psalm

The Psalmist rejoices in sins forgiven and even in the difficult times that inspired true repentance. YAHWEH is a hiding place in times of trouble for those who will look to him.

New Testament

Paul praises the Thessalonians who are steadfast in the midst of suffering and persecution. Indeed, they are growing in faith and love through the power of God, bringing glory to the Lord Jesus.

Gospel

St. Luke tells the story of Zacchaeus who, in the midst of his sin, had a passion to see Jesus in spite of the obscuring throng. Up in the tree above the crowd he hears Jesus’ word and his life is transformed as he experiences the new life of God’s salvation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *