Readings for April 9, 2017 Year A Liturgy of the Passion

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 50:4-9a.
  • Psalm 31:9-16

Second Reading

  • Philippians 2:5-11

Gospel

  • Matthew 26:14-27:66

Alternative Gospel

  • Matthew 27:11-54

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Isaiah envisions YAHWEH’s obedient Servant under assault: enduring insults, spitting and being struck. He is determined not to flinch from his duty and does not waver from his conviction that YAHWEH is his help and will vindicate him. In comparison his adversaries fade into insignificance. Under serious affliction from all those around him, the Psalmist is driven to tears, misery and extreme physical weakness. Realizing this has happened because of his faithfulness, he remains confident that YAHWEH will deliver him. St. Paul encourages the Philippians to be like Jesus who, although divine, humbled himself and endured a demeaning death, and to keep in mind that, in the end, he was exalted by God to be Lord of all. Matthew’s account of Jesus’ last hours, betrayal, Last Supper, Gethsemane, desertion, trials, abuses, mockings, crucifixion and death, is marked by a strong sense that this is all part of God’s plan. Jesus himself struggles to submit to his destiny but throughout the narrative he illustrates that he willingly does so, refusing to exercise his rights and power as the Son of God. His innocence and evident majesty is sharply underlined by the fraud and weakness of his accusers.

As Introductions and/or for Bulletin Use

Old Testament

Isaiah envisions YAHWEH’s obedient Servant under assault: enduring insults, spitting and being struck. He is determined not to flinch from his duty and does not waver from his conviction that YAHWEH is his help and will vindicate him. In comparison his adversaries fade into insignificance.

Psalm

Under serious affliction from all those around him, the Psalmist is driven to tears, misery and extreme physical weakness. Realizing this has happened because of his faithfulness, he remains confident that YAHWEH will deliver him.

New Testament

St. Paul encourages the Philippians to be like Jesus who, although divine, humbled himself and endured a demeaning death, and to keep in mind that, in the end, he was exalted by God to be Lord of all.

Gospel

Matthew’s account of Jesus’ last hours, betrayal, Last Supper, Gethsemane, desertion, trials, abuses, mockings, crucifixion and death, is marked by a strong sense that this is all part of God’s plan. Jesus himself struggles to submit to his destiny but throughout the narrative he illustrates that he willingly does so, refusing to exercise his rights and power as the Son of God. His innocence and evident majesty is sharply underlined by the fraud and weakness of his accusers.

Based on the Alternative Readings

Isaiah envisions YAHWEH’s obedient Servant under assault: enduring insults, spitting and being struck. He is determined not to flinch from his duty and does not waver from his conviction that YAHWEH is his help and will vindicate him. In comparison his adversaries fade into insignificance. Under serious affliction from all those around him, the Psalmist is driven to tears, misery and extreme physical weakness. Realizing this has happened because of his faithfulness, he remains confident that YAHWEH will deliver him. St. Paul encourages the Philippians to be like Jesus who, although divine, humbled himself and endured a demeaning death, and to keep in mind that, in the end, he was exalted by God to be Lord of all. St. Matthew’s accounts of Jesus’ trial before Pilate, his mocking by the soldiers and the crucifixion itself, all highlight the tension and misunderstanding over his being “King of the Jews”. His innocence and evident majesty is sharply underlined by the jealousy of his accusers and the weakness of the governor. Ending with the climactic recognition of the centurion that he had just crucified the Son of God, the reader is left in no doubt regarding the true identity of Jesus.

As Introductions and/or for Bulletin Use

Old Testament

Isaiah envisions YAHWEH’s obedient Servant under assault: enduring insults, spitting and being struck. He is determined not to flinch from his duty and does not waver from his conviction that YAHWEH is his help and will vindicate him. In comparison his adversaries fade into insignificance.

Psalm

Under serious affliction from all those around him, the Psalmist is driven to tears, misery and extreme physical weakness. Realizing this has happened because of his faithfulness, he remains confident that YAHWEH will deliver him.

New Testament

St. Paul encourages the Philippians to be like Jesus who, although divine, humbled himself and endured a demeaning death, and to keep in mind that, in the end, he was exalted by God to be Lord of all.

Gospel

St. Matthew’s accounts of Jesus’ trial before Pilate, his mocking by the soldiers and the crucifixion itself, all highlight the tension and misunderstanding over his being “King of the Jews”. His innocence and evident majesty is sharply underlined by the jealousy of his accusers and the weakness of the governor. Ending with the climactic recognition of the centurion that he had just crucified the Son of God, the reader is left in no doubt regarding the true identity of Jesus.

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