Eighth Sunday after Pentecost, August 4, 2019, Proper 13, Year C

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Full lections can be read here.

 

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Hosea 11:1-11)

Depicting Israel as a wayward son, the Lord recalls how he has tenderly cared for the nation and still cares for it. Although judgment is rightly coming upon Israel he cannot abandon them to absolute destruction. Someday they will return to the land and to the Lord.

Psalm (107:1-9, 43)

The Psalmist celebrates the steadfast love of the Lord for his people. He has redeemed them from exile and restored them to the land in spite of their wandering astray. Having had their needs supplied, he calls the nation to remember and give thanks.

Second Reading (Colossians 3:1-11)

Paul writes that Christians have been raised with Christ and spells out the implications of this fact. We are to live a life rooted in heavenly values, not in earthly ones. Having new selves, no worldly religious, social or national divisions apply to those who are one in Christ.

Gospel (Luke 12:13-21)

When a man wants Jesus to take his side in an inheritance dispute, Jesus uses the opportunity to warn against greed. He tells of a man who gloried in his rich harvest and assumed he was set for life but died instead. We are to be rich toward God rather than store up earthly treasure.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • You can’t out-love God
  • Our eyes are to be focussed on things above, where our priorities should lie
  • In the midst of death, we are in life
  • God’s care for his people is expressed in judgment and redemption
  • The Lord expects us to live different lives from those who do not serve him, and he holds us to account

 

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Ecclesiastes 1:2, 12-14; 2:18-23)

Contemplating the fact that we all must die, the Teacher is struck by the futility of a life that is spent pursuing things that we cannot take with us when we go. Instead, others will enjoy the fruit of our labour, knowledge and wisdom. Even worrying about these things is futile.

Psalm (49:1-12)

In light of the fact that we all die, the Psalmist points out that wealth cannot save us from this fate, nor can wisdom. All humankind, rich and poor, wise and foolish, will go to the grave, leaving everything behind. Why then fear those who persecute us? They too will die.

Second Reading (Colossians 3:1-11)

Paul writes that Christians have been raised with Christ and spells out the implications of this fact. We are to live a life rooted in heavenly values, not in earthly ones. Having new selves, no worldly religious, social or national divisions apply to those who are one in Christ.

Gospel (Luke 12:13-21)

When a man wants Jesus to take his side in an inheritance dispute, Jesus uses the opportunity to warn against greed. He tells of a man who gloried in his rich harvest and assumed he was set for life but died instead. We are to be rich toward God rather than store up earthly treasure.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • In the midst of life, we are in death
  • In the midst of death, we are in life
  • A life centred on what this world has to offer is ultimately futile
  • Our eyes are to be focussed on things above, where our priorities should lie.
  • The Lord expects us to live different lives from those who do not serve him, and he holds us to account

 

 

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