Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost, September 13, 2020

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Full lections can be read here

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Exodus 14:19-31)

The angel and the pillar of cloud place themselves between Israel and the pursuing Egyptian army. Moses stretches out his hand and a wind from the Lord parts the Red Sea. Pharaoh drowns with all his soldiers and Israel learns to trust in God.

Psalm (114)

The Psalmist celebrates the Exodus as the time when the Lord came to dwell with Israel. Both the Red Sea and the Jordan River parted for them as well. The natural elements respond to his commands. Indeed, the whole earth trembles at his awesome presence.

OR

Exodus 15:1b-11, 20-21

The Song of Moses exults in the victory of the Lord when the Egyptian army drowned in the Red Sea. The Lord proved himself in full control of nature and superior to any other gods. Miriam, sister to Moses and a prophet herself, joins in the joyous refrain.

Second Reading (Romans 14:1-12)

Paul states that both those who put emphasis on the observance of holy days or dietary laws and those who do not should honour each other. Both groups are trying to live as unto the Lord and we should leave it up to him to be the judge.

Gospel (Matthew 18:21-35)

To answer a question from Peter, Jesus tells a parable about a slave who is forgiven a great debt by a king but refuses himself to forgive a tiny sum owed to him. This angers the king and we can expect the same of God when we do not forgive our fellow believer. 

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • God is not subject to nature but in control of it
  • Nature is witness to the greatness of God
  • Judgment is real, but it is in the hands of God, not our own
  • The importance of community life in the Kingdom
  • Forgiveness and forbearance are to mark the Christian life

Scripture Sentence (BAS, Canada)

A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another as I have loved you. John 13.34

Collect of the Day (BAS, Canada)

Almighty God,
you call your Church to witness
that in Christ we are reconciled to you.
Help us so to proclaim the good news of your love, that all who hear it may turn to you;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. AMEN

Based on the Alternate Readings

First Reading (Genesis 50:15-21)

Trembling before him in Egypt, Joseph’s brothers tell him that their father Jacob had asked that he forgive them for selling him into slavery. They are worried about payback, but Joseph weeps and tells them that God had intended their evil for good all along.

Psalm (103:[1-7], 8-13)

The Psalmist calls us to bless the Lord for all he does and all he is: he forgives, heals, delivers and satisfies us with good things. A merciful and gracious Yahweh works justice for the oppressed and removes our sin far from us, not repaying us what we deserve. 

Second Reading (Romans 14:1-12)

Paul states that both those who put emphasis on the observance of holy days or dietary laws and those who do not should honour each other. Both groups are trying to live as unto the Lord and we should leave it up to him to be the judge.

Gospel (Matthew 18:21-35)

To answer a question from Peter, Jesus tells a parable about a slave who is forgiven a great debt by a king but refuses himself to forgive a tiny sum owed to him. This angers the king and we can expect the same of God when we do not forgive our fellow believer.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • God is in control of the course of history
  • Judgment is real, but it is in the hands of God, not our own
  • The importance of community life in the Kingdom
  • Forgiveness and forbearance are to mark the Christian life
  • We are to extend to others what God has so much more extended to us

Scripture Sentence (BAS, Canada)

A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another as I have loved you. John 13.34

Collect of the Day (BAS, Canada)

Almighty God,
you call your Church to witness
that in Christ we are reconciled to you.
Help us so to proclaim the good news of your love, that all who hear it may turn to you;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. AMEN

Seventh Sunday after Pentecost, July 19, 2020

Please see How to Use Lection Connection.

Full lections can be read here.

 

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Genesis 28:10-19a)

Jacob dreams that where he is sleeping there is a ladder with angels moving between earth and heaven. The Lord gives him the same promise he made to Abraham and vows not to leave him until it is fulfilled. Awestruck, Jacob calls the place the “house of God”.

Psalm (139:1-12, 23-24)

The Psalmist, awestruck that the Lord knows him intimately wherever he might be, invites divine examination to expose his every wickedness and lead him in the everlasting way under his divine protection.

Second Reading (Romans 8:12-25)

Paul writes that living by the flesh brings death while living by the Spirit brings life, including adoption as God’s children to be heirs of his new creation. Present suffering cannot compare to this coming glory for those bearing the first fruits of the Spirit.

Gospel (Matthew 13:24-30, 36-43)

Jesus tells about a farmer who sowed seed on his land only to discover that an enemy had sowed weeds. To preserve the grain, he put off weeding until harvest. Similarly, Jesus says, both evil and righteous folk will share the kingdom until judgment at the end.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The way of the Lord versus the way of the world
  • A new world is coming for the faithful
  • Awe at the presence of God
  • Justice will prevail in spite of current circumstances
  • The promises of God are sure
  • The inheritors of God’s promises are under his care and already enjoying his presence

Scripture Sentence (BAS, Canada)

My word shall accomplish that which I purpose, and prosper in the thing for which I sent it. Isaiah 55.11

Collect of the Day (BAS, Canada)

Almighty God,
your Son has opened for us
a new and living way into your presence.
Give us pure hearts and constant wills
to worship you in spirit and in truth;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. AMEN

 

Based on the Alternate Readings

First Reading (Isaiah 44:6-8)

In asserting his uniqueness as the one and only God, the Lord challenges other so-called gods to prove themselves by predicting the future as he has done. Israel, witnessing this truth repeatedly, has every reason to trust in him and to not fear current circumstances.

Psalm (86:11-17)

The Psalmist pleads with the Lord for an undivided heart, serving and glorifying him alone. Having been delivered before through the steadfast love of the Lord, he asks for deliverance from the ungodly who now threaten his very life.

Second Reading (Romans 8:12-25)

Paul writes that living by the flesh brings death while living by the Spirit brings life, including adoption as God’s children to be heirs of his new creation. Present suffering cannot compare to this coming glory for those bearing the first fruits of the Spirit.

Gospel (Matthew 13:24-30, 36-43)

Jesus tells about a farmer who sowed seed on his land only to discover that an enemy had sowed weeds. To preserve the grain, he put off weeding until harvest. Similarly, Jesus says, both evil and righteous folk will share the kingdom until judgment at the end.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The way of the Lord versus the way of the world
  • A new world is coming for the faithful
  • Justice will prevail in spite of current circumstances
  • The Lord our God is a jealous God
  • We can trust in the Lord on the basis of his historical acts of salvation

Scripture Sentence (BAS, Canada)

My word shall accomplish that which I purpose, and prosper in the thing for which I sent it. Isaiah 55.11

Collect of the Day (BAS, Canada)

Almighty God,
your Son has opened for us
a new and living way into your presence.
Give us pure hearts and constant wills
to worship you in spirit and in truth;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. AMEN

Fourth Sunday in Lent, Year A, March 22, 2020

Please see How to Use Lection Connection.

Full lections can be read here.

 

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (1 Samuel 16:1-13)

After Saul had failed as the first king of Israel, the Lord sends Samuel to anoint one of Jesse’s sons as the next king. To everyone’s surprise, the Lord, who sees the heart, selects David the shepherd boy. Samuel anoints him and he is filled with the Spirit.

Psalm (23)

David likens his relationship with the Lord to a sheep who trusts that the shepherd knows what he is doing in spite of appearances. He provides water, food and shelter, even in circumstances that a sheep would see as extremely threatening.

Second Reading (Ephesians 5:8-14)

Paul asserts that, in the Lord, Christians have become light, bearing fruit which is good, right and true. They now oppose and shun the darkness and its useless works from which they have come. Christ is the light who makes all this happen.

Gospel (John 9:1-41)

In healing a man born blind Jesus shows that he is the light of the world. The man’s physical and spiritual darkness is dispersed while the Pharisees, who should recognize Messiah, heighten their opposition. Jesus says he has come to expose all to the light.

 

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • Jesus is the light of the world, not just part of it
  • We need to see with the eyes of faith
  • Our judgment needs to go beyond superficial appearances
  • God is interested in the attitudes of our hearts more than he is in how things (or we} look to others
  • When Jesus comes into our lives, we see things differently
  • What does it mean to be “light”?

SCRIPTURE SENTENCE (BAS, Canada)

I am the light of the world, says the Lord; those who follow me will have the light of life. John 8.12

COLLECT OF THE DAY (BAS, Canada)

Almighty God,
through the waters of baptism
your Son has made us children of light.
May we ever walk in his light
and show forth your glory in the world;
through Jesus Christ our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. AMEN

 

Second Sunday of Advent, December 8, 2019, Year A

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Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Isaiah 11:1-10)

Through Isaiah, the Lord announces that the line of King David’s father Jesse will be revived with the coming of a righteous and just ruler endowed with the Spirit of God. The nations will notice when the poor and meek thrive and even the brutality of nature is transformed.

Psalm (72:1-7, 18-19)

The Psalmist prays that his current king, or perhaps a future king, will be a righteous judge who delivers the poor and punishes the oppressor. Long may his reign of prosperity, righteousness, and peace, endure. The Lord, whose glory already fills the earth, will accomplish all of this.

Second Reading (Romans 15:4-13)

St. Paul urges the Romans to live in harmony, especially in giving glory to God. They should imitate Jesus, who has welcomed them, as Gentiles, into his kingdom. This was foreseen in the ancient promises of Scripture which looked to the line of Jesse for the hope of the nations.

Gospel (Matthew 3:1-12)

Matthew tells us that the appearance of John the Baptist is the fulfillment of Isaiah’s word regarding the forerunner of the Lord. John insists that what God demands is true repentance and warns that one who will baptize with the Holy Spirit and the fire of judgment is coming.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The Lord uses both establishment and outsider types to fulfill his plan
  • Jesus is the hope of the nations
  • The arrival of the Kingdom of God is good news and bad news because Jesus is both universal king and judge
  • Jesus is the expected Davidic king and judge
  • It is all according to Plan

Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost, November 17, 2019, Proper 28, Year C

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Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Isaiah 65:17-25)

The Lord describes his coming salvation for Israel in terms of a new heaven and a new earth. It will be so blessed that there will be only joy and delight, no weeping or mourning. Each life will be fully lived and even wild animals will be at peace.

Psalm Substitute (Isaiah 12)

The Psalm, taken from Isaiah as well, celebrates the coming day of God’s salvation as an occasion for thanksgiving and joy to be known throughout the earth. The greatness of the Lord will be seen to be with his people.

Second Reading (2 Thessalonians 3:6-13)

Paul urges the Thessalonians to not be idle or to put up with idlers. They are to follow his own industrious example by not being a burden to anyone. He exhorts those who are lazy meekly to earn their own living.

Gospel (Luke 21:5-19)

Jesus tells his disciples that terrible times lie ahead for Jerusalem but even that is not the end. After a time of severe persecution, false messiahs will arise during worldwide turmoil. He assures his disciples of his help and that no final harm will come to them.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The future of salvation is tied to that of the people of Israel
  • God’s ultimate salvation is a worldwide event
  • Until the final resolution of all things, Christians can expect conflict and struggle to mark their lives
  • God’s final salvation will transcend all the ambiguities and difficulties of this life

 

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Malachi 4:1-2a)

The prophet Malachi uses the image of burning stubble to convey the devastating judgment of the Lord upon the disobedient. However, upon those who honour him, the healing sun of righteousness will rise.

Psalm (98)

The Psalmist calls for exuberant praise to the Lord because of his decisive lifting up of Israel. All the nations bear witness to this miracle and are urged to join in rejoicing along with nature itself. The Lord will be the righteous judge of the whole earth.

Second Reading (2 Thessalonians 3:6-13)

Paul urges the Thessalonians to not be idle or to put up with idlers. They are to follow his own industrious example by not being a burden to anyone. He exhorts those who are lazy meekly to earn their own living.

Gospel (Luke 21:5-19)

Jesus tells his disciples that terrible times lie ahead for Jerusalem but even that is not the end. After a time of severe persecution, false messiahs will arise during worldwide turmoil. He assures his disciples of his help and that no final harm will come to them.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The future of salvation is tied to that of the people of Israel
  • God’s ultimate salvation is a worldwide event
  • Until the final resolution of all things, Christians can expect conflict and struggle to mark their lives
  • The judge of all the earth will be the only One who is perfectly qualified to do so and we can trust absolutely that he will do the right thing

Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost, October 6, 2019, Proper 22, Year C

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

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Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Lamentations 1:1-6)

The writer of Lamentations is eloquent in his sad description of a ruined and desolate Judah and Jerusalem, once majestic among the nations, now like a forlorn widow. He notes simply that this has all come about because of unfaithfulness to the Lord.

Psalm Substitute (Lamentations 3:19-26)

The author of Lamentations continues by expressing his deep pain at Judah’s fate but remembers that the Lord is merciful and faithful and his salvation worth waiting for. From this though he derives his hope.

Second Reading (2 Timothy 1:1-14)

Paul, himself suffering for being faithful, trusts in Christ for his ultimate vindication. He urges Timothy to join him in suffering for the gospel, rekindling the gift of faith that was also in his mother and grandmother and holding to the message of grace already given.

Gospel (Luke 17:5-10)

In response to his disciples’ request for more faith, Jesus asserts that true faith is indeed powerful enough to move mountains. But in contrast he affirms that humble obedience through the simple performance of our duties is the best expression of faith.

Connection Suggestions

  • Disobedience or obedience may result in suffering
  • Doing the right thing because it is the right thing is always the right thing
  • Repent or perish!
  • Simple faithful obedience is better than spectacular demonstrations of faith

 

Based on the Alternative Readings A

First Reading (Lamentations 1:1-6)

The writer of Lamentations is eloquent in his sad description of a ruined and desolate Judah and Jerusalem, once majestic among the nations, now like a forlorn widow. He notes simply that this has all come about because of unfaithfulness to the Lord.

Psalm (137)

The Psalmist bitterly resents the conquerors’ demands for entertainment from the captives. Blaming only the enemies of Judah, especially the Babylonians, for the disaster, he calls on the Lord to execute terrible judgment upon them.

Second Reading (2 Timothy 1:1-14)

Paul, himself suffering for being faithful, trusts in Christ for his ultimate vindication. He urges Timothy to join him in suffering for the gospel, rekindling the gift of faith that was also in his mother and grandmother and holding to the message of grace already given.

Gospel (Luke 17:5-10)

In response to his disciples’ request for more faith, Jesus asserts that true faith is indeed powerful enough to move mountains. But in contrast he affirms that humble obedience through the simple performance of our duties is the best expression of faith.

Connection Suggestions

  • Disobedience or obedience may result in suffering
  • Doing the right thing because it is the right thing is always the right thing
  • Simple faithful obedience is better than spectacular demonstrations of faith
  • Faithfulness in suffering is sustained by a focus on grace received

 

Based on Alternative Readings B

First Reading (Habakkuk 1:1-4; 2:1-4)

Crying out for the Lord to end his silence concerning Judah’s destruction, the prophet Habakkuk decides simply to await the divine word. He is told of a coming “end” for which he is to wait, trusting in God’s word. It is by such faith that the righteous will live.

Psalm (37:1-9)

“Just wait” is the counsel of the Psalmist to those who agonize over the triumph of the wicked all around him. Look to the Lord and all will be well. Burning anger will lead to evil but faithfulness will result in inheriting the land and the destruction of the wicked.

Second Reading (2 Timothy 1:1-14)

Paul, himself suffering for being faithful, trusts in Christ for his ultimate vindication. He urges Timothy to join him in suffering for the gospel, rekindling the gift of faith that was also in his mother and grandmother and holding to the message of grace already given.

Gospel (Luke 17:5-10)

In response to his disciples’ request for more faith, Jesus asserts that true faith is indeed powerful enough to move mountains. But in contrast he affirms that humble obedience through the simple performance of our duties is the best expression of faith.

Connection Suggestions

  • Doing the right thing because it is the right thing is always the right thing
  • Simple faithful obedience is better than spectacular demonstrations of faith
  • Faithfulness in suffering is sustained by a focus on grace received
  • Trusting in God often means waiting for him

 

 

 

 

 

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost, September 1, 2019, Proper 17, Year C

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

 

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Jeremiah 2:4-13)

Through Jeremiah the Lord charges Israel with gross unfaithfulness. In spite of many blessings at God’s hand, they have become as worthless as the idols to which they have turned. The Lord is outraged that they have forsaken him, the true God, for useless figments of their imagination.

Psalm (81:1, 10-16)

The Psalmist, speaking for the Lord, recites Israel’s refusal to obey the Lord. In spite of his bringing them out of Egypt into the Promised Land they prefer their own ways to his. He yearns for his people to repent so that he can deliver them and pour abundant blessings upon them.

Second Reading (Hebrews 13:1-8, 15-16)

The author exhorts his readers to continue in mutual love, living it out in hospitality, care for prisoners and marriage. They are to be content with what they have, trusting in the Lord’s help and offering continual sacrifices of word and deed through an unchanging Christ.

Gospel (Luke 14:1, 7-14)

A guest in a Jewish leader’s home, Jesus notices how people try to get the best places at the table. He tells them it is better to take a low position and then be invited higher. Indeed, it is better to invite the needy than those who will repay. Such actions reflect how God works with us.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • An hospitable people reflect their hospitable God
  • Humility and repentance are two sides of the same coin
  • A little humility goes a long way
  • In spite of assured blessings for following the paths of our God, we still forsake them for our own road to disaster
  • Vanity, vanity, all is vanity

 

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Proverbs 25:6-7)

The writer advises that a person should not presume a position among the great because it is better to be invited to come forward than to be embarrassed by being shown a lesser place.

Psalm (112)

The Psalmist notes that those who fear the Lord will be among the great and prosperous in the Land. They give light to others by their gracious conduct, generosity to those in need, and righteous conduct. Secure in the Lord, they provoke the envy of the wicked in their vain desires.

Second Reading (Hebrews 13:1-8, 15-16)

The author exhorts his readers to continue in mutual love, living it out in hospitality, care for prisoners and marriage. They are to be content with what they have, trusting in the Lord’s help and offering continual sacrifices of word and deed through an unchanging Christ.

Gospel (Luke 14:1, 7-14)

A guest in a Jewish leader’s home, Jesus notices how people try to get the best places at the table. He tells them it is better to take a low position and then be invited higher. Indeed, it is better to invite the needy than those who will repay. Such actions reflect how God works with us.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • An hospitable people reflect their hospitable God
  • Humility and repentance are two sides of the same coin
  • A little humility goes a long way
  • In spite of assured blessings for following the paths of our God, we still forsake them for our own road to disaster
  • Vanity, vanity, all is vanity

 

 

 

Tenth Sunday after Pentecost, August 18, 2019, Proper 15, Year C

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Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Isaiah 5:1-7)

The Lord is bewildered by his beloved Israel, his vineyard, which has produced only wild grapes in spite of his faithful attention. As a result, he will give it up to be laid waste and become overgrown with weeds. He expected justice and righteousness from them but got the opposite.

Psalm (80:1-2, 8-19)

The Psalmist implores Israel’s Shepherd to come and save her just like a farmer would save a luxuriant vine over which he has faithfully toiled. Why is he allowing it to be attacked and destroyed? Surely if he rescues them they will be faithful to him in the future.

Second Reading (Hebrews 11:29-12:2)

The writer recounts the story of Israel’s flight from Egypt and entrance into the Promised Land as a story of faith. Her history has been full of faith-filled men and women, including Jesus, who died without seeing what God had promised. Like them, we should press on in the life of faith.

Gospel (Luke 12:49-56)

Jesus, filled with anguish over what is going to happen to him, warns that he is bringing fire and division to the earth. Even families will be divided against one another and he wonders why it is that the crowds hearing him cannot see that these things are about to take place.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • Even God wonders at our faithlessness
  • God’s judgment, while deserved, is intended to result in changed behaviour on our part
  • It is difficult to be faithful when faithfulness does not seem to be rewarded
  • God cares deeply for those he disciplines

 

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Jeremiah 23:23-29)

Because he sees everything, the Lord wonders why false prophets dare to speak lies designed to draw his people away from him. Indeed, let them speak, but also let others speak his true word! Only it has any real power and so is readily distinguished from false dreams and visions.

Psalm (82)

The Psalmist pictures the Lord as the divine judge rendering his verdict upon those responsible for administering justice upon the earth. They have failed in their responsibility to protect the weak and needy and so it is time for God himself to come in judgment.

Second Reading (Hebrews 11:29-12:2)

The writer recounts the story of Israel’s flight from Egypt and entrance into the Promised Land as a story of faith. Her history has been full of faith-filled men and women, including Jesus, who died without seeing what God had promised. Like them, we should press on in the life of faith.

Gospel (Luke 12:49-56)

Jesus, filled with anguish over what is going to happen to him, warns that he is bringing fire and division to the earth. Even families will be divided against one another and he wonders why it is that the crowds hearing him cannot see that these things are about to take place.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • Even God wonders at our faithlessness
  • God’s judgment, while deserved, is intended to result in changed behaviour on our part
  • It is difficult to be faithful when faithfulness does not seem to be rewarded
  • From God’s divine perspective all of humanity and all of human history is present: nothing escapes his view

 

 

Eighth Sunday after Pentecost, August 4, 2019, Proper 13, Year C

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

 

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Hosea 11:1-11)

Depicting Israel as a wayward son, the Lord recalls how he has tenderly cared for the nation and still cares for it. Although judgment is rightly coming upon Israel he cannot abandon them to absolute destruction. Someday they will return to the land and to the Lord.

Psalm (107:1-9, 43)

The Psalmist celebrates the steadfast love of the Lord for his people. He has redeemed them from exile and restored them to the land in spite of their wandering astray. Having had their needs supplied, he calls the nation to remember and give thanks.

Second Reading (Colossians 3:1-11)

Paul writes that Christians have been raised with Christ and spells out the implications of this fact. We are to live a life rooted in heavenly values, not in earthly ones. Having new selves, no worldly religious, social or national divisions apply to those who are one in Christ.

Gospel (Luke 12:13-21)

When a man wants Jesus to take his side in an inheritance dispute, Jesus uses the opportunity to warn against greed. He tells of a man who gloried in his rich harvest and assumed he was set for life but died instead. We are to be rich toward God rather than store up earthly treasure.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • You can’t out-love God
  • Our eyes are to be focussed on things above, where our priorities should lie
  • In the midst of death, we are in life
  • God’s care for his people is expressed in judgment and redemption
  • The Lord expects us to live different lives from those who do not serve him, and he holds us to account

 

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Ecclesiastes 1:2, 12-14; 2:18-23)

Contemplating the fact that we all must die, the Teacher is struck by the futility of a life that is spent pursuing things that we cannot take with us when we go. Instead, others will enjoy the fruit of our labour, knowledge and wisdom. Even worrying about these things is futile.

Psalm (49:1-12)

In light of the fact that we all die, the Psalmist points out that wealth cannot save us from this fate, nor can wisdom. All humankind, rich and poor, wise and foolish, will go to the grave, leaving everything behind. Why then fear those who persecute us? They too will die.

Second Reading (Colossians 3:1-11)

Paul writes that Christians have been raised with Christ and spells out the implications of this fact. We are to live a life rooted in heavenly values, not in earthly ones. Having new selves, no worldly religious, social or national divisions apply to those who are one in Christ.

Gospel (Luke 12:13-21)

When a man wants Jesus to take his side in an inheritance dispute, Jesus uses the opportunity to warn against greed. He tells of a man who gloried in his rich harvest and assumed he was set for life but died instead. We are to be rich toward God rather than store up earthly treasure.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • In the midst of life, we are in death
  • In the midst of death, we are in life
  • A life centred on what this world has to offer is ultimately futile
  • Our eyes are to be focussed on things above, where our priorities should lie.
  • The Lord expects us to live different lives from those who do not serve him, and he holds us to account

 

 

Fifth Sunday after Pentecost, July 14, 2019, Proper 10, Year C

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Amos 7:7-17)

Jeroboam, the king of northern Israel receives a message from the Lord through the prophet Amos. The king and the nation have strayed far from the commandments of God and will soon lose their land and go into exile in a foreign country. The indictment is not well received.

Psalm (82)

God is pictured presiding in his divine council and indicting those in earth who abuse the poor and lowly who should be granted justice and deliverance instead. The oppressors are walking in darkness, thinking highly of themselves in spite of the fact that they are mere mortals.

Second Reading (Colossians 1:1-14)

Paul thanks God for the faith and mutual love of the Colossian Christians. Rooted in the hope of the Gospel, they share in a worldwide move of the Spirit who is producing in them the fruit of knowledge and good works. Paul prays they will endure by God’s power over sin and darkness.

Gospel (Luke 10:25-37)

Jesus agrees with a religious lawyer that in order to inherit eternal life one must fervently love God and one’s neighbour. He tells of a man who was beaten, robbed, and then ignored by Jewish religious leaders. But a despised Samaritan took mercy and became his true neighbour.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • God’s point of view is often shocking to us humans
  • Disobedience to God has serious consequences
  • The kingdom of God is to extend throughout the earth, across all human borders
  • Self-deception is a dangerous thing

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Deuteronomy 30:9-14)

Just before he dies, Moses charges the Israelites to keep God’s commandments and flourish as a result. These are not beyond their reach, being already in their mouths and hearts. But they must be observed.

Psalm (25:1-10)

The Psalmist turns to the Lord for protection, asking for knowledge of his ways and to be led in his truth. He acknowledges his sin and makes his appeal based only on God’s mercy and love. He is the one who leads humble sinners in his blessed ways as they keep faith with him.

Second Reading (Colossians 1:1-14)

Paul thanks God for the faith and mutual love of the Colossian Christians. Rooted in the hope of the Gospel, they share in a worldwide move of the Spirit who is producing in them the fruit of knowledge and good works. Paul prays they will endure by God’s power over sin and darkness.

Gospel (Luke 10:25-37)

Jesus agrees with a religious lawyer that in order to inherit eternal life one must fervently love God and one’s neighbour. He tells of a man who was beaten, robbed, and then ignored by Jewish religious leaders. But a detested Samaritan took mercy and became his true neighbour.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • God’s point of view is often shocking to us humans
  • The kingdom of God is to extend throughout the earth, across all human borders
  • Self-deception is a dangerous thing
  • God makes his ways known to us if we are open and humble before him