Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost, August 25, 2019, Proper 16, Year C

Please see How to Use Lection Connection 

Full lections can be read here.

 

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Jeremiah 1:4-10)

Jeremiah is only a boy when the Lord tells him that he is to be to be a prophet to the nations. In fact, he is told that he had been chosen for this intimidating task before birth. Now he is being placed over the nations, having been entrusted with the all-powerful Word of the living God.

Psalm (71:1-6)

Recognizing that God is his fortress and his rock, the Psalmist appeals for divine rescue from the wicked. He declares that he has relied upon the Lord his entire life, even from the day of his birth.

Second Reading (Hebrews 12: 18-29)

The author contrasts the admittedly awesome and terrifying establishment of the Old Covenant under Moses with the much greater aspects of the New, mediated by Jesus. The old regime is giving way to an unshakeable new kingdom, worthy of our total reverence and devotion.

Gospel (Luke 13:10-17)

When Jesus heals a woman who had been crippled for eighteen years, the synagogue leaders object because it is done on a sabbath. But Jesus rebukes them, observing that even they would untie and care for mere beasts on a sabbath, while he has freed a fellow Israelite from her pain.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The kingdom of God coming through Jesus builds on but supersedes all that came before
  • While the Lord is always with us, he acts according to his own timing
  • Nothing is beyond the power of the Lord to enable and deliver us
  • Through Christ we have entered into the ultimate stage of redemption

 

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Isaiah 58:9b-14)

Isaiah tells the nation that treating others with compassion and fairness is the path back into the Lord’s favour and blessing. This would include observing the sabbath as a delight rather than out of self-interest. In this way they would be both physically and spiritually revived.

Psalm (103:1-8)

The Psalmist calls upon the people to bless the Lord for all he has done for them by forgiving them and granting them fruitful and healthy lives. He has revealed himself through Moses and given them his law. His love and attention have been lavished upon them and they lack nothing.

Second Reading (Hebrews 12: 18-29)

The author contrasts the admittedly awesome and terrifying establishment of the Old Covenant under Moses with the much greater aspects of the New, mediated by Jesus. The old regime is giving way to an unshakeable new kingdom, worthy of our total reverence and devotion.

Gospel (Luke 13:10-17)

When Jesus heals a woman who had been crippled for eighteen years, the synagogue leaders object because it is done on a sabbath. But Jesus rebukes them, observing that even they would untie and care for mere beasts on a sabbath, while he has freed a fellow Israelite from her pain.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The kingdom of God coming through Jesus builds on but supersedes all that came before
  • God’s rules are intended for our flourishing, not merely as obligations to obey
  • Nothing is beyond the power of the Lord to enable and deliver us
  • Through Christ we have entered into the ultimate stage of redemption
  • We should be deeply grateful for all we have received from the Lord

 

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