Thanksgiving Day, Canada, Year C, October 13, 2019

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

 

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Deuteronomy 26:1-11)

Moses commands the Israelites, once they have arrived in the Promised Land, to bring its first fruits as an offering to the Lord while reciting the story of their deliverance from Egypt. The harvest is to be celebrated as part of God’s gracious provision for his people.

Psalm (100)

The Psalmist calls upon the whole world to worship the Lord because he is the creator of all. His courts are to be filled with praise and thanksgiving for his goodness, steadfast love and eternal faithfulness through the years.

Second Reading (Philippians 4:4-9)

Paul calls the Philippians to “Rejoice” while encouraging his readers to turn to God in prayer and thanksgiving instead of worrying about things. This leads to a profound peace that can be maintained by focusing our thoughts and actions on all things good.

Gospel (John 6:25-35)

The people who had just been miraculously fed by Jesus now demand a sign like the bread from heaven that Moses gave their ancestors. In response, Jesus claims to be the Father’s gift of “true bread from heaven”, the “bread of life”. This food satisfies forever.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • Giving thanks for God’s provision for the necessities of life
  • God provides for both our material and spiritual needs
  • Thanksgiving is a way of life
  • Praise and thanksgiving orient us to the One who is behind all blessings

Thanksgiving Sunday (Canada), October 7, 2018, Year B

Lections for Proper 22, Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost can be found here.

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Joel 2:21-27)

The prophet Joel reveals that the whole earth, nature, and Israel are to join in celebrating a coming era of abundant harvests. Their time of punishment and failed crops is coming to an end. These events will demonstrate that the Lord alone is God.

Psalm (126)

Reflecting on those blessed occasions when Yahweh had restored Israel’s fortunes in the past, the Psalmist calls upon him once again to act in like manner. Although his people have sown with tears he is confident that they shall reap in joy under Yahweh’s hand.

Second Reading (1 Timothy 2:1-7)

Speaking as the apostle to the Gentiles, St. Paul encourages prayers and thanksgivings to be made for everyone, including those with power to protect the church. It is God’s desire that all be saved through the mediation of Christ Jesus, the ransom for all.

Gospel (Matthew 6:25-33)

Jesus says that instead of striving and worrying over the necessities of life, his disciples are to seek God’s kingdom above all else. God marvelously provides for all his creation and we can trust him to provide for us, as we are the most valuable of his creatures.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • Giving thanks for God’s provision for the necessities of life
  • God is still at work in creation and through people
  • God turns around our disobedience, tears, and worry and brings joy instead
  • The welfare of humankind is God’s primary focus

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving Day, October 8, 2017, Year A

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Deuteronomy 8:7-18)

Moses warns the Israelites not to forget Yahweh when they occupy Canaan and begin to enjoy the extreme fruitfulness of the Land. It was Yahweh who not only brought them out of Egypt and through the wilderness but who also gives them the strength to work the land and acquire great wealth. They owe it all to him.

Psalm (65)

The Psalmist calls for praise to the God who answers prayer and forgives sins. Those among whom he dwells are blessed indeed, but, as he is the hope of the ends of the earth, all flesh will come to him. As creator he continues to provide the resources for the enormous bounty of the earth, eliciting joy from the whole realm of nature.

Second Reading (2 Corinthians 9:6-15)

One of St. Paul’s major projects was the collection and delivery of funds from the Gentile churches for the relief of the Jewish Christians in Jerusalem. Here he encourages the Corinthians to give cheerfully and generously remembering that their blessings have come from God in the first place. Indeed, their giving will generate further blessing for themselves as well as thanksgiving to God from both Paul and the recipients.

Gospel (Luke 17:11-19)

Ten lepers approach Jesus for healing as he makes his way down to Jerusalem. He tells them to show themselves to the priests whose task it is to determine if those with communicable diseases are well enough to re-enter society. On their way they are all healed but only one of them, a Samaritan, returns to thank Jesus and praise God. It amazes Jesus that only one out of ten had come back and he sends him on his way with a commendation.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • All that we have, including possessions and abilities, comes from God
  • Giving thanks is not to be taken for granted but needs to be encouraged
  • Failing to give thanks is often an act of forgetfulness
  • God has already done so much for us that thanksgiving is always called for
  • Thanksgiving for blessings, especially when tangibly expressed, brings blessings in turn
  • You can’t out-give God

 

 

 

 

 

Readings for October 9, 2016 Year C Proper 23 (28) AND Thanksgiving Sunday (Canada) Year C

*Some readers may desire to use a portion of Lection Connection as a brief introduction to each passage as it is read in church. To make this easier please see “As Introductions” after each outline.

[See below for Year C Proper 23 (28)]

Thanksgiving Sunday

First Reading and Psalm

  • Deuteronomy 26:1-11
  • Psalm 100

Second Reading

  • Philippians 4:4-9

Gospel

  • John 6:25-35

Full lections can be read here.

Connection Based on the Readings as Set

Moses commands the Israelites, once they have arrived in the Promised Land, to bring its first fruits as an offering to YAHWEH while reciting the story of their deliverance from Egypt. In this way the harvest is to be celebrated as part of God’s abundant provision for his people. The Psalm could well be taken as providing a liturgical text for such a celebration, calling as it does for exuberant praise and thanksgiving for all of YAHWEH’s love and faithfulness. Paul begins the Philippians reading with another call to “Rejoice” while encouraging his readers to turn to God in prayer and thanksgiving instead of worrying about anything. This leads to a profound peace that can be maintained by focusing our thoughts and actions on all things good. In the Gospel Jesus is questioned by people who are focused on the wrong thing: food that perishes. In spite of their newly-filled bellies, they demand of Jesus a sign like the bread from heaven Moses gave their ancestors. In response Jesus claims to be the Father’s gift of “true bread from heaven”, the “bread of life”. “Whoever comes to me will never be hungry and whoever believes in me will never thirst”. Clearly, he is the focus we should seek and the gift for which we should give thanks.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Moses commands the Israelites, once they have arrived in the Promised Land, to bring its first fruits as an offering to YAHWEH while reciting the story of their deliverance from Egypt. In this way the harvest is to be celebrated as part of God’s abundant provision for his people.

Psalm

The Psalm could well be taken as providing a liturgical text for such a celebration, calling as it does for exuberant praise and thanksgiving for all of YAHWEH’s love and faithfulness.

New Testament

Paul begins the Philippians reading with another call to “Rejoice” while encouraging his readers to turn to God in prayer and thanksgiving instead of worrying about anything. This leads to a profound peace that can be maintained by focusing our thoughts and actions on all things good.

Gospel

In the Gospel Jesus is questioned by people who are focused on the wrong thing: food that perishes. In spite of their newly-filled bellies, they demand of Jesus a sign like the bread from heaven Moses gave their ancestors. In response Jesus claims to be the Father’s gift of “true bread from heaven”, the “bread of life”. “Whoever comes to me will never be hungry and whoever believes in me will never thirst”. Clearly, he is the focus we should seek and the gift for which we should give thanks.

Year C Proper 23 (28)

First reading and Psalm

  • Jeremiah 29:1, 4-7
  • Psalm 66:1-12

Alternate First reading and Psalm

  • 2 Kings 5:1-3, 7-15c
  • Psalm 111

Second reading

  • 2 Timothy 2:8-15

Gospel

  • Luke 17:11-19

Full lections can be read here.

Connection Based on the Readings as Set

Jeremiah’s letter to the exiles in Babylon encourages them to treat this time not as a mournful interlude to be endured but as a time to settle down and prosper. They are to build houses, take wives and have families as normal. Even more, they are actually to seek the welfare of the city of their captivity because if it is blessed, they will be blessed as well. The Psalmist calls the whole earth to acknowledge and worship God because of his greatness seen in all his works, especially his deliverance of the Israelite nation from Egypt as well as its continued existence. Paul, himself suffering in captivity, carries on his ministry as normal, encouraging Timothy based on the Christian’s identification with Jesus who himself died but rose again, guaranteeing our own eventual resurrection. Timothy is charged with imparting this message to his congregation simply and in a straightforward manner that avoids wrangling over words. The Gospel tells how Jesus healed ten lepers but only the “foreigner”, blessed along with the Jews, returned to give praise to God the God of Israel.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Jeremiah’s letter to the exiles in Babylon encourages them to treat this time not as a mournful interlude to be endured but as a time to settle down and prosper. They are to build houses, take wives and have families as normal. Even more, they are actually to seek the welfare of the city of their captivity because if it is blessed, they will be blessed as well.

Psalm

The Psalmist calls the whole earth to acknowledge and worship God because of his greatness seen in all his works, especially his deliverance of the Israelite nation from Egypt as well as its continued existence.

New Testament

Paul, himself suffering in captivity, carries on his ministry as normal, encouraging Timothy based on the Christian’s identification with Jesus who himself died but rose again, guaranteeing our own eventual resurrection. Timothy is charged with imparting this message to his congregation simply and in a straightforward manner that avoids wrangling over words.

Gospel

The Gospel tells how Jesus healed ten lepers but only the “foreigner”, blessed along with the Jews, returned to give praise to God the God of Israel.

Connection Based on the Alternative Readings

A young daughter of Israel, seeking the welfare of her captor Naaman, commander of the Aramean army, tells him about the prophet Elisha back in Samaria who could cure his leprosy. Naaman is not only cured once he follows the straightforward word of the prophet, but he also comes to faith in the God of Israel. A foreigner truly blessed! The Psalmist calls for thanks to be given to YAHWEH for his wonderful works. Those works, especially redeeming Israel and giving the Law, have gained him great renown. To have faith in YAHWEH is to be on the path of wisdom. Paul, himself suffering in captivity, carries on his ministry as normal, encouraging Timothy based on the Christian’s identification with Christ Jesus who himself died but rose again, guaranteeing our own eventual resurrection. Timothy is charged with imparting this message to his congregation simply and in a straightforward manner that avoids wrangling over words. The Gospel tells how Jesus healed ten lepers but only the “foreigner”, blessed along with the Jews, returned to give praise to God the God of Israel.

As Introductions

Old Testament

A young daughter of Israel, seeking the welfare of her captor Naaman, commander of the Aramean army, tells him about the prophet Elisha back in Samaria who could cure his leprosy. Naaman is not only cured once he follows the straightforward word of the prophet, but he also comes to faith in the God of Israel. A foreigner truly blessed!

Psalm

The Psalmist calls for thanks to be given to YAHWEH for his wonderful works. Those works, especially redeeming Israel and giving the Law, have gained him great renown. To have faith in YAHWEH is to be on the path of wisdom.

New Testament

Paul, himself suffering in captivity, carries on his ministry as normal, encouraging Timothy based on the Christian’s identification with Jesus who himself died but rose again, guaranteeing our own eventual resurrection. Timothy is charged with imparting this message to his congregation simply and in a straightforward manner that avoids wrangling over words.

Gospel

The Gospel tells how Jesus healed ten lepers but only the “foreigner”, blessed along with the Jews, returned to give praise to God the God of Israel.