Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost, September 16, 2018, Proper 19, Year B

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Proverbs 1:20-33)

Wisdom calls out to both the simple and the scoffer to listen to her or find themselves in ruin and unable to save themselves from circumstances of their own making. Those who take Wisdom to heart, who fear the Lord, will find security and peace.

Psalm (19)

Even though the creation itself cannot speak it does declare God’s word. Like the sun revives the earth each day, the Law of God joyfully revives the soul. Following it has its own rewards. Our thoughts, as well as our words, need to be in tune with God’s ways.

Second Reading (James 3:1-12)

James warns that teachers should take care because they will be held to a higher standard. The tongue, although small, can be the spark that sets off a poisonous fire. If it utters both blesses and curses it is only reflecting the unperfected heart of the speaker.

Gospel (Mark 8:27-38)

In response to Jesus’ question, Peter identifies him as the Messiah. Jesus then says that he will suffer, die, and then rise again. Peter strongly objects, but Jesus emphasizes that God’s way is that both he and his followers are to lose their lives in order to save them.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The way of God, although contrary to human inclinations, leads to life and peace
  • Be careful little tongue what you say
  • What we say reflects who we are
  • True faithfulness is more than skin deep

Based on the Alternative Readings

First Reading (Isaiah 50:4-9a)

Isaiah speaks of the servant of the Lord, a teacher whose word sustains the weary and is determined to accomplish his appointed task in spite of suffering. He knows the Lord is near to help and no one has grounds to say that he is guilty of anything wrong.

Psalm (116:1-9)

The Psalmist speaks of having called to the Lord in a life-threatening crisis and being delivered from death. The Lord protects those who simply trust in him and delivers them from death, enabling them to walk before him among the living.

Second Reading (James 3:1-12)

James warns that teachers should take care because they will be held to a higher standard. The tongue, although small, can be the spark that sets off a poisonous fire. If it utters both blesses and curses it is only reflecting the unperfected heart of the speaker.

Gospel (Mark 8:27-38)

In response to Jesus’ question, Peter identifies him as the Messiah. Jesus then says that he will suffer, die, and then rise again. Peter strongly objects, but Jesus emphasizes that God’s way is that both he and his followers are to lose their lives in order to save them.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The way of God, although contrary to human inclinations, leads to life and peace
  • God will sustain the faithful, even through death itself
  • Be careful little tongue what you say
  • The call to teach the Word of God is both scary and rewarding

 

Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost, October 1, 2017, Proper 21, Year A

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

First Reading (Exodus 17:1-7)

Having complained earlier about bitter water, now the Israelites test Yahweh by quarrelling with Moses because they find no water at Rephidim. Again Yahweh miraculously provides for them, this time having Moses strike a rock and cause water to come out. A very frustrated Moses gives the place the name “Testing” and “Quarrelling”.

Psalm (78:1-4, 12-16)

The Psalmist calls Israel to treat the “dark” story of Yahweh’s repeated provisions for their fathers during the Exodus experience as a cautionary tale that they will both celebrate and pass on to their own children. Later in the Psalm he will remark that the Israelites did not learn their lesson in the wilderness.

Second Reading (Philippians 2:1-13)

St. Paul pleads with his readers to abandon selfish ambition and conduct themselves in all humility, putting the needs of others first. This is to adopt “the mind of Christ”, who did not exploit his equality with God but took on human form, humbling himself to death on a cross. Refusing to exalt himself, God raised his name above all others as Lord of all and it is this same God who works in believers to accomplish his purposes.

Gospel (Matthew 21:23-32)

To the Jewish leaders who demand to know the source of his authority, Jesus poses the question of John the Baptist. Was his authority human or divine? If they say “divine” they will have to answer for their unbelief. If they say “human” John’s many followers will be upset. He then tells them a parable that emphasizes true obedience as action not words. Even notorious sinners who truly believed John are going into the kingdom before those whose righteousness is only skin deep.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • Testing the Lord is not a good policy
  • It is not an easy thing to change a sinful heart (but Christ can)
  • Miracles, even repeated miracles, will not by themselves suffice for faith
  • God is a God of grace and mercy
  • Humility or self-focus? Which opens the door to others and to God?
  • Unbelief is rooted in unwillingness, not in lack of evidence

Based on the Alternative Set of Readings

First Reading (Ezekiel 18:1-4, 25-32)

Yahweh stakes his claim to every individual life and pronounces each person responsible for his or her own actions. He points out the unfairness of punishing the child for the sins of the parents. No, the person who sins is the one who dies. On the other hand, if they turn from their sins they shall live. Yahweh, having no pleasure in a sinner’s death, calls each one individually to repentance that they might live.

Psalm (25:1-9)

The Psalmist expresses his keen desire to know and follow the ways of Yahweh. He calls out for help because Yahweh is full of mercy and steadfast love, eager to respond to the humble. It is on this basis, on Yahweh’s character alone, that the Psalmist asks for forgiveness of youthful sins.

Second Reading (Philippians 2:1-13)

St. Paul pleads with his readers to abandon selfish ambition and conduct themselves in all humility, putting the needs of others first. This is to adopt “the mind of Christ”, who did not exploit his equality with God but took on human form, humbling himself to death on a cross. Refusing to exalt himself, God raised his name above all others as Lord of all and it is this same God who works in believers to accomplish his purposes.

Gospel (Matthew 21:23-32)

To the Jewish leaders who demand to know the source of his authority, Jesus poses the question of John the Baptist. Was his authority human or divine? If they say “divine” they will have to answer for their unbelief. If they say “human” John’s many followers will be upset. He then tells them a parable that emphasizes true obedience as action not words. Even notorious sinners who truly believed John are going into the kingdom before those whose righteousness is only skin deep.

CONNECTION SUGGESTIONS

  • The importance of taking personal responsibility for one’s sin
  • Personal and/or corporate repentance?
  • Is God unfair?
  • It is not an easy thing to change a sinful heart (but Christ can)
  • Miracles, even repeated miracles, will not by themselves suffice for faith
  • God is a God of grace and mercy
  • Humility or self-focus? Which opens the door to others and to God?