Readings for January 6, 2017 Year A The Epiphany of Our Lord

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

 

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 60:1-6
  • Psalm 72:1-7, 10-14

Second Reading

  • Ephesians 3:1-12

Gospel

  • Matthew 2:1-12

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Isaiah informs the nation of Israel that, while things are indeed dark at present, a time will come when all that will change dramatically. The glory of YAHWEH himself will shine upon them so powerfully that all the nations will be attracted to it. They shall bring the wealth of the seas and the land, including gold and frankincense, to present to a joyful Israel. The Psalm is a prayer for the king, that he may rule in justice and righteousness, defending the poor and crushing the oppressor. May the kings of the nations bring him tribute and gifts, bowing down and serving him. May he live forever! St. Paul speaks of the mystery, now revealed especially in his own apostleship, of how the Gentiles are to be included in the people of God. This was always God’s purpose in sending Jesus, to whom anyone can come by faith. St. Matthew tells of how wise men from the Gentile lands to the East arrived at the court of King Herod with news that a king must have been born nearby, one whose birth was marked by a great sign in the sky. Sent to the village of Bethlehem and following the star, they found the infant. Bowing deeply, they presented royal gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. Leaving directly for home, they failed to report to Herod because he had other plans for the child who would be king.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Isaiah informs the nation of Israel that, while things are indeed dark at present, a time will come when all that will change dramatically. The glory of YAHWEH himself will shine upon them so powerfully that all the nations will be attracted to it. They shall bring the wealth of the seas and the land, including gold and frankincense, to present to a joyful Israel.

Psalm

The Psalm is a prayer for the king, that he may rule in justice and righteousness, defending the poor and crushing the oppressor. May the kings of the nations bring him tribute and gifts, bowing down and serving him. May he live forever!

New Testament

St. Paul speaks of the mystery, now revealed especially in his own apostleship, of how the Gentiles are to be included in the people of God. This was always God’s purpose in sending Jesus, to whom anyone can come by faith.

Gospel

St. Matthew tells of how wise men from the Gentile lands to the East arrived at the court of King Herod with news that a king must have been born nearby, one whose birth was marked by a great sign in the sky. Sent to the village of Bethlehem and following the star, they found the infant. Bowing deeply, they presented royal gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. Leaving directly for home, they failed to report to Herod because he had other plans for the child who would be king.

 

Readings for January 1, 2017 Year A First Sunday after Christmas Day

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

 

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 63:7-9
  • Psalm 148

Second Reading

  • Hebrews 2:10-18

Gospel

  • Matthew 2:13-23

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

In Isaiah’s day God’s people were under serious threat and things were not looking good. The prophet reminds them of YAHWEH’s many past kindnesses to their ancestors in words that call to mind their escape from the grasp of Pharaoh in the days of the Exodus. In so doing he emphasizes that salvation was gained, not through a mere messenger, but through God’s very Presence carrying them each step of the way. The Psalmist exhorts the inhabitants of the heavens and then the creatures of the earth, animate and inanimate alike, to praise YAHWEH as their creator. A mighty one such as this has been provided for his people! The writer of Hebrews emphasizes that Jesus, as the pioneer of our salvation, has become one of us, sharing our flesh and blood and our experience as human beings. This makes him fit to be both the sacrifice for sin and a faithful high priest to offer it on our behalf. Matthew recounts how, under the direct guidance of God’s angel each step of the way, the holy family escaped the threat of Herod’s grasp by going down to Egypt and then returning in safety to the Holy Land. He draws attention to how all this resonates with the experience of ancient Israel.

As Introductions

Old Testament

In Isaiah’s day God’s people were under serious threat and things were not looking good. The prophet reminds them of YAHWEH’s many past kindnesses to their ancestors in words that call to mind their escape from the grasp of Pharaoh in the days of the Exodus. In so doing he emphasizes that salvation was gained, not through a mere messenger, but through God’s very Presence carrying them each step of the way.

Psalm

The Psalmist exhorts the inhabitants of the heavens and then the creatures of the earth, animate and inanimate alike, to praise YAHWEH as their creator. A mighty one such as this has been provided for his people!

New Testament

The writer of Hebrews emphasizes that Jesus, as the pioneer of our salvation, has become one of us, sharing our flesh and blood and our experience as human beings. This makes him fit to be both the sacrifice for sin and a faithful high priest to offer it on our behalf.

Gospel

Matthew recounts how, under the direct guidance of God’s angel each step of the way, the holy family escaped the threat of Herod’s grasp by going down to Egypt and then returning in safety to the Holy Land. He draws attention to how all this resonates with the experience of ancient Israel.

 

Readings for December 25, 2016 Year A Christmas Proper 1

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

 

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 9:2-7
  • Psalm 96

Second Reading

  • Titus 2:11-14

Gospel

  • Luke 2:1-20

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Isaiah, writing at the lowest point in Israel’s history, sets forth a remarkable vision of a time in which the nation’s fortunes will be wonderfully and miraculously reversed. A son will be given to the line of David and he will exercise his power and authority wisely, ruling forever over a kingdom of peace, justice and righteousness. This will come about because YAHWEH is behind him all the way. The Psalmist calls all the nations to abandon their idols and come to worship YAHWEH in a song they have never sung before. He is coming to judge the peoples fairly and bringing salvation with him. As a result even nature will join in a universal outpouring of praise. St. Paul declares that through the death of Jesus Christ God’s grace has come into a world set against him, bringing salvation to all. This same grace is preparing us to live godly lives as we await his final appearing at the end of the age. St. Luke tells of how Jesus came into this world in the line of David, in the city of David, and with the praise of angels. But it was to a band of humble shepherds they appeared and it was to a simple manger the men were sent. There they caught a glimpse of the tiny Saviour whose coming had shattered their nighttime sky into glorious light. It was Messiah at last!

As Introductions

Old Testament

Isaiah, writing at the lowest point in Israel’s history, sets forth a remarkable vision of a time in which the nation’s fortunes will be wonderfully and miraculously reversed. A son will be given to the line of David and he will exercise his power and authority wisely, ruling forever over a kingdom of peace, justice and righteousness. This will come about because YAHWEH is behind him all the way.

Psalm

The Psalmist calls all the nations to abandon their idols and come to worship YAHWEH in a song they have never sung before. He is coming to judge the peoples fairly and bringing salvation with him. As a result even nature will join in a universal outpouring of praise.

New Testament

St. Paul declares that through the death of Jesus Christ God’s grace has come into a world set against him, bringing salvation to all. This same grace is preparing us to live godly lives as we await his final appearing at the end of the age.

Gospel

St. Luke tells of how Jesus came into this world in the line of David, in the city of David, and with the praise of angels. But it was to a band of humble shepherds they appeared and it was to a simple manger the men were sent. There they caught a glimpse of the tiny Saviour whose coming had shattered their nighttime sky into glorious light. It was Messiah at last!

Readings for December 18, 2016 Year A Fourth Sunday of Advent

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

 

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 7:10-16
  • Psalm 80:1-7, 17-19

Second Reading

  • Romans 1:1-7

Gospel

  • Matthew 1:18-25

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Challenged by two attacking armies, King Ahaz of Judah, apparently not quite believing Isaiah’s prophecy of victory for his troops, hesitates to ask for a confirming sign. In response, a rather exasperated YAHWEH provides a sign himself: a young woman, perhaps even a virgin, shall bear an extraordinary son named “God is with us” or Emmanuel, and before he even knows right from wrong the fortunes of the enemy will be reversed. The Psalm is a plea to the Shepherd of Israel to put aside his anger with his sheep and shine his face upon them again. Then his right hand man can go into action; then they will be saved and restored; then they will never again turn away from their God; then they will have life. St. Paul begins his letter to the Romans by reminding them that they, as non-Jews, have especially benefited from his calling as apostle to the Gentiles. The Gospel they have received was promised in the Jewish Old Testament prophecies about a Jewish Messiah, the Son of David. Jesus not only fits this description, he was actually declared Son of God by his resurrection from the dead. By grace they too have been welcomed into his now universal fold. Matthew relates how Joseph is directed by an angel to follow through on his engagement to Mary because she is with child through an extraordinary act of the Holy Spirit. In fact, the son she is carrying will save his people from their sins! This birth by a virgin, Matthew tells us, is actually the ultimate fulfillment of the promise of Emmanuel given through the prophet.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Challenged by two attacking armies, King Ahaz of Judah, apparently not quite believing Isaiah’s prophecy of victory for his troops, hesitates to ask for a confirming sign. In response, a rather exasperated YAHWEH provides a sign himself: a young woman, perhaps even a virgin, shall bear an extraordinary son named “God is with us” or Emmanuel, and before he even knows right from wrong the fortunes of the enemy will be reversed.

Psalm

The Psalm is a plea to the Shepherd of Israel to put aside his anger with his sheep and shine his face upon them again. Then his right hand man can go into action; then they will be saved and restored; then they will never again turn away from their God; then they will have life.

New Testament

St. Paul begins his letter to the Romans by reminding them that they, as non-Jews, have especially benefited from his calling as apostle to the Gentiles. The Gospel they have received was promised in the Jewish Old Testament prophecies about a Jewish Messiah, the Son of David. Jesus not only fits this description, he was actually declared Son of God by his resurrection from the dead. By grace they too have been welcomed into his now universal fold.

Gospel

Matthew relates how Joseph is directed by an angel to follow through on his engagement to Mary because she is with child through an extraordinary act of the Holy Spirit. In fact, the son she is carrying will save his people from their sins! This birth by a virgin, Matthew tells us, is actually the ultimate fulfillment of the promise of Emmanuel given through the prophet.

 

 

Readings for December 11, 2016 Year A Third Sunday of Advent

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

 

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 35:1-10
  • Psalm 146:5-10

Alternative “Psalm”

  • Luke 1:46b-55

Second Reading

  • James 5:7-10

Gospel

  • Matthew 11:2-11

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

The prophet Isaiah foresees YAHWEH gloriously bursting into creation and the life of his people, bringing about dramatic reverses of fortune. The parched land will blossom and flourish while the blind will see, the lame will walk and the deaf will hear. All the ransomed will return along a new highway to Zion in a transformed state of everlasting joy. The Psalmist declares happy all those whose hope is in YAHWEH because he will keep faith forever. He is the creator, after all, and the one who lifts up all who are oppressed and brings down all who are wicked. He will reign forever in Zion. James encourages his readers to be as patient as a farmer waiting for his crops while they look toward the coming of the Lord. He assures them that since it will not be long before the judge arrives they should remain in unity with one another and endure their sufferings as did the prophets before them. The Gospel today relates how John the Baptist, having been imprisoned by Herod, sends representatives to Jesus in order to confirm that he is the one to come after all. Jesus tells them simply to report what they see: the blind see, the lame walk, the deaf hear, the dead are raised and the poor receive good news. He then teaches the crowds that although John is in fact the herald of Messiah, the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.

As Introductions

Old Testament

The prophet Isaiah foresees YAHWEH gloriously bursting into creation and the life of his people, bringing about dramatic reverses of fortune. The parched land will blossom and flourish while the blind will see, the lame will walk and the deaf will hear. All the ransomed will return along a new highway to Zion in a transformed state of everlasting joy.

Psalm

The Psalmist declares happy all those whose hope is in YAHWEH because he will keep faith forever. He is the creator, after all, and the one who lifts up all who are oppressed and brings down all who are wicked. He will reign forever in Zion.

New Testament

James encourages his readers to be as patient as a farmer waiting for his crops while they look toward the coming of the Lord. He assures them that since it will not be long before the judge arrives to set things right, they should remain in unity with one another and endure their sufferings as did the prophets before them.

Gospel

The Gospel today relates how John the Baptist, having been imprisoned by Herod, sends representatives to Jesus in order to confirm that he is the one to come after all. Jesus tells them simply to report what they see: the blind see, the lame walk, the deaf hear, the dead are raised and the poor receive good news. He then teaches the crowds that although John is in fact the herald of Messiah, the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.

Based on the Alternative Readings

The prophet Isaiah foresees YAHWEH gloriously bursting into creation and the life of his people, bringing about dramatic reverses of fortune. The parched land will blossom and flourish while the blind will see, the lame will walk and the deaf will hear. All the ransomed will return along a new highway to Zion in a transformed state of everlasting joy. In Mary’s Song, the Virgin praises God for raising her from obscurity to become the mother of the Lord. She proclaims this as part of the divine pattern of lifting up the lowly and needy and putting down the proud and rich, a pattern that is rooted in the covenant promise made to Abraham and his descendants. James encourages his readers to be as patient as a farmer waiting for his crops while they look toward the coming of the Lord. He assures them that since it will not be long before the judge arrives to set things right, they should remain in unity with one another and endure their sufferings as did the prophets before them. The Gospel today relates how John the Baptist, having been imprisoned by Herod, sends representatives to Jesus in order to confirm that he is the one to come after all. Jesus tells them simply to report what they see: the blind see, the lame walk, the deaf hear, the dead are raised and the poor receive good news. He then teaches the crowds that although John is in fact the herald of Messiah, the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.

As Introductions

Old Testament

The prophet Isaiah foresees YAHWEH gloriously bursting into creation and the life of his people, bringing about dramatic reverses of fortune. The parched land will blossom and flourish while the blind will see, the lame will walk and the deaf will hear. All the ransomed will return along a new highway to Zion in a transformed state of everlasting joy.

Psalm

In Mary’s Song, the Virgin praises God for raising her from obscurity to become the mother of the Lord. She proclaims this as part of the divine pattern of lifting up the lowly and needy and putting down the proud and rich, a pattern that is rooted in the covenant promise made to Abraham and his descendants.

New Testament

James encourages his readers to be as patient as a farmer waiting for his crops while they look toward the coming of the Lord. He assures them that since it will not be long before the judge arrives to set things right, they should remain in unity with one another and endure their sufferings as did the prophets before them.

Gospel

The Gospel today relates how John the Baptist, having been imprisoned by Herod, sends representatives to Jesus in order to confirm that he is the one to come after all. Jesus tells them simply to report what they see: the blind see, the lame walk, the deaf hear, the dead are raised and the poor receive good news. He then teaches the crowds that although John is in fact the herald of Messiah, the least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.

 

 

 

Readings for December 4, 2016 Year A Second Sunday of Advent

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 11:1-10
  • Psalm 72:1-7, 18-19

Second Reading

  • Romans 15:4-13

Gospel

  • Matthew 3:1-12

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Through Isaiah YAHWEH announces that the line of King David’s father Jesse will be revived with the coming of a righteous and just ruler endowed with the Spirit of God. He will preside over a kingdom in which the poor and the meek shall thrive while even nature, red in tooth and claw, shall be transformed. As a result all nations will be drawn to this coming monarch. The Psalmist prays that the king of his own day or perhaps a future king will be a righteous judge who delivers the poor and punishes the oppressor. Long may he reign while righteousness flourishes and peace abounds. It is YAHWEH who will accomplish all this and whose glory already fills the whole earth. St. Paul calls upon the Christians in Rome to live in accord with one another, especially in giving glory to God. They should welcome each other just as Jesus has welcomed them, as Gentiles, into the kingdom. He affirms that Scripture has foreseen and celebrated this development as part of the promise of Isaiah regarding the line of Jesse, giving hope to all nations. Matthew tells us that the wild appearance of John the Baptist in the desert is the fulfillment of Isaiah’s word that the forerunner of the LORD would be just such a figure. John rebukes those who are self-righteous because they have been born as Jews, pointing out that what God requires is true repentance: merely being children of Abraham does not qualify anyone for the coming kingdom. He then tells the crowd that the one who is coming after him will baptize them with the Holy Spirit and fire. Look out!

As Introductions

Old Testament

Through Isaiah YAHWEH announces that the line of King David’s father Jesse will be revived with the coming of a righteous and just ruler endowed with the Spirit of God. He will preside over a kingdom in which the poor and the meek shall thrive while even nature, red in tooth and claw, shall be transformed. As a result all nations will be drawn to this coming monarch.

Psalm

The Psalmist prays that the king of his own day or perhaps a future king will be a righteous judge who delivers the poor and punishes the oppressor. Long may he reign while righteousness flourishes and peace abounds. It is YAHWEH who will accomplish all this and whose glory already fills the whole earth.

New Testament

St. Paul calls upon the Christians in Rome to live in accord with one another, especially in giving glory to God. They should welcome each other just as Jesus has welcomed them, as Gentiles, into the kingdom. He affirms that Scripture has foreseen and celebrated this development as part of the promise of Isaiah regarding the line of Jesse, giving hope to all nations.

Gospel

Matthew tells us that the wild appearance of John the Baptist in the desert is the fulfillment of Isaiah’s word that the forerunner of the LORD would be just such a figure. John rebukes those who are self-righteous because they have been born as Jews, pointing out that what God requires is true repentance: merely being children of Abraham does not qualify anyone for the coming kingdom. He then tells the crowd that the one who is coming after him will baptize them with the Holy Spirit and fire. Look out!

 

 

 

Readings for November 27, 2016 Year A First Sunday of Advent

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 2:1-5
  • Psalm 122

Second Reading

  • Romans 13:11-14

Gospel

  • Matthew 24:36-44

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Isaiah sees a time when Jerusalem, as the location of the temple, will be exalted and attract the nations eager to learn the ways of God as his word issues forth from its precincts. The LORD shall act as judge between the nations, resulting in an everlasting and universal peace. The prophet then urges his readers to “walk in the light of the LORD.” The Psalmist exults in the joy of finding himself in the house of YAHWEH and within the walls of Jerusalem. Here is the very centre of divine worship and the place of kingly judgment. He ends with an exhortation to pray for its peace. St. Paul reminds the Christians at Rome that as the night is almost over they should cast off the works of darkness and live as in the day. Which means clothing oneself with Jesus and casting off the works of the flesh. In the Gospel Jesus deals with his second coming, how no one except the Father knows the hour. He likens it to the days of Noah when judgment took away those not ready and left behind the faithful who were saved on the ark. We are to live each moment as if it was the expected hour, living as we should be living and therefore ready to greet the Son of Man.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Isaiah sees a time when Jerusalem, as the location of the temple, will be exalted and attract the nations eager to learn the ways of God as his word issues forth from its precincts. The LORD shall act as judge between the nations, resulting in an everlasting and universal peace. The prophet then urges his readers to “walk in the light of the LORD.”

Psalm

The Psalmist exults in the joy of finding himself in the house of YAHWEH and within the walls of Jerusalem. Here is the very centre of divine worship and the place of kingly judgment. He ends with an exhortation to pray for its peace.

New Testament

St. Paul reminds the Christians at Rome that as the night is almost over they should cast off the works of darkness and live as in the day. Which means clothing oneself with Jesus and casting off the works of the flesh.

Gospel

In the Gospel Jesus deals with his second coming, how no one except the Father knows the hour. He likens it to the days of Noah when judgment took away those not ready and left behind the faithful who were saved on the ark. We are to live each moment as if it was the expected hour, living as we should be living and therefore ready to greet the Son of Man.

 

Readings for November 20, 2016 The Reign of Christ Year C Proper 29 (34) & Thanksgiving Day (U.S.)

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

Readings for Thanksgiving Day (U.S) are below.

The Reign of Christ Proper 29(34)

First Reading and Psalm

  • Jeremiah 23:1-6
  • Luke 1:68-79

First Reading and Alternative Psalm

  • Jeremiah 23:1-6
  • Psalm 46

Second Reading

  • Colossians 1:11-20

Gospel

  • Luke 23:33-43

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Through the prophet Jeremiah YAHWEH rebukes the false shepherds who have ruined his people and promises to gather them himself from the places to which they have been scattered. New faithful shepherds will be appointed and they will be ruled over by a “Righteous Branch” from the house of David whose name will remind YAHWEH’s people that a right relationship with him is grounded, not in them, but in him. Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist, announces in an excited burst of poetry that his infant son will be the long-awaited prophet who prepares the way of the Lord. The light of Israel’s great deliverance from the darkness of her own sins and all her enemies is now beginning to dawn. St. Paul prays that the Colossians will experience God’s strength to endure and give thanks to him for delivering them from the power of darkness by granting them “a share in the inheritance of the saints in light”. This redemption has come by the reconciliation of all things to himself through his beloved Son on the cross, a Son in whom his own fullness dwells. St. Luke records Jesus’ words of forgiveness from the cross while the leaders of the people and the soldiers scoffed at his seeming inability to save himself. Meanwhile Jesus majestically grants entrance into Paradise to the repentant thief. The irony is exquisite.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Through the prophet Jeremiah YAHWEH rebukes the false shepherds who have ruined his people and promises to gather them himself from the places to which they have been scattered. New faithful shepherds will be appointed and they will be ruled over by a “Righteous Branch” from the house of David whose name will remind YAHWEH’s people that a right relationship with him is grounded, not in them, but in him.

Psalm

Zacharias, the father of John the Baptist, announces in an excited burst of poetry that his infant son will be the long-awaited prophet who prepares the way of the Lord. The light of Israel’s great deliverance from the darkness of her own sins and all her enemies is now beginning to dawn.

New Testament

St. Paul prays that the Colossians will experience God’s strength to endure and give thanks to him for delivering them from the power of darkness by granting them “a share in the inheritance of the saints in light”. This redemption has come by the reconciliation of all things to himself through his beloved Son on the cross, a Son in whom his own fullness dwells.

Gospel

St. Luke records Jesus’ words of forgiveness from the cross while the leaders of the people and the soldiers scoffed at his seeming inability to save himself. Meanwhile Jesus majestically grants entrance into Paradise to the repentant thief. The irony is exquisite.

Based on the Alternative Readings

Through the prophet Jeremiah YAHWEH rebukes the false shepherds who have ruined his people and promises to gather them himself from the places to which they have been scattered. New faithful shepherds will be appointed and they will be ruled over by a “Righteous Branch” from the house of David whose name will remind YAHWEH’s people that a right relationship with him is grounded, not in them, but in him. The Psalmist depicts YAHWEH’s majestic rule in the midst of the chaos and trouble of life. He provides joy like a river flowing through the city of God as the morning dawns. St. Paul prays that the Colossians will experience God’s strength to endure and give thanks to him for delivering them from the power of darkness by granting them “a share in the inheritance of the saints in light”. This redemption has come by the reconciliation of all things to himself through his beloved Son on the cross, a Son in whom his own fullness dwells. St. Luke records Jesus’ words of forgiveness from the cross while the leaders of the people and the soldiers scoff at his seeming inability to save himself. Meanwhile Jesus majestically grants entrance into Paradise to the repentant thief. The irony is exquisite.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Through the prophet Jeremiah YAHWEH rebukes the false shepherds who have ruined his people and promises to gather them himself from the places to which they have been scattered. New faithful shepherds will be appointed and they will be ruled over by a “Righteous Branch” from the house of David whose name will remind YAHWEH’s people that a right relationship with him is grounded, not in them, but in him.

Psalm

The Psalmist depicts YAHWEH’s majestic rule in the midst of the chaos and trouble of life. He provides joy like a river flowing through the city of God as the morning dawns.

New Testament

St. Paul prays that the Colossians will experience God’s strength to endure and give thanks to him for delivering them from the power of darkness by granting them “a share in the inheritance of the saints in light”. This redemption has come by the reconciliation of all things to himself through his beloved Son on the cross, a Son in whom his own fullness dwells.

Gospel

St. Luke records Jesus’ words of forgiveness from the cross while the leaders of the people and the soldiers scoffed at his seeming inability to save himself. Meanwhile Jesus majestically grants entrance into Paradise to the repentant thief. The irony is exquisite.

Thanksgiving Day (U.S.) November 24, 2016

First Reading and Psalm

  • Deuteronomy 26:1-11
  • Psalm 100

Second Reading

  • Philippians 4:4-9

Gospel

  • John 6:25-35

Full lections can be read here.

Connection Based on the Readings as Set

Moses commands the Israelites, once they have arrived in the Promised Land, to bring its first fruits as an offering to YAHWEH while reciting the story of their deliverance from Egypt. In this way the harvest is to be celebrated as part of God’s abundant provision for his people. The Psalm could well be taken as providing a liturgical text for such a celebration, calling as it does for exuberant praise and thanksgiving for all of YAHWEH’s love and faithfulness. Paul begins the Philippians reading with another call to “Rejoice” while encouraging his readers to turn to God in prayer and thanksgiving instead of worrying about anything. This leads to a profound peace that can be maintained by focusing our thoughts and actions on all things good. In the Gospel Jesus is questioned by people who are focused on the wrong thing: food that perishes. In spite of their newly-filled bellies, they demand of Jesus a sign like the bread from heaven Moses gave their ancestors. In response Jesus claims to be the Father’s gift of “true bread from heaven”, the “bread of life”. “Whoever comes to me will never be hungry and whoever believes in me will never thirst”. Clearly, he is the focus we should seek and the gift for which we should give thanks.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Moses commands the Israelites, once they have arrived in the Promised Land, to bring its first fruits as an offering to YAHWEH while reciting the story of their deliverance from Egypt. In this way the harvest is to be celebrated as part of God’s abundant provision for his people.

Psalm

The Psalm could well be taken as providing a liturgical text for such a celebration, calling as it does for exuberant praise and thanksgiving for all of YAHWEH’s love and faithfulness.

New Testament

Paul begins the Philippians reading with another call to “Rejoice” while encouraging his readers to turn to God in prayer and thanksgiving instead of worrying about anything. This leads to a profound peace that can be maintained by focusing our thoughts and actions on all things good.

Gospel

In the Gospel Jesus is questioned by people who are focused on the wrong thing: food that perishes. In spite of their newly-filled bellies, they demand of Jesus a sign like the bread from heaven Moses gave their ancestors. In response Jesus claims to be the Father’s gift of “true bread from heaven”, the “bread of life”. “Whoever comes to me will never be hungry and whoever believes in me will never thirst”. Clearly, he is the focus we should seek and the gift for which we should give thanks.

Readings for November 13, 2016 Year C Proper 28 (33)

Please see How to Use Lection Connection

First Reading and Psalm

  • Isaiah 65:17-25
  • Isaiah 12

Alternative First Reading and Psalm

  • Malachi 4:1-2a
  • Psalm 98

Second Reading

  • 2 Thessalonians 3:6-13

Gospel

  • Luke 21:5-19

Full lections can be read here.

Based on the Readings as Set

Through the prophet Isaiah YAHWEH sets out his coming salvation for Israel in terms of a new heaven and a new earth. It will be so blessed that there will be only joy and delight, no weeping or mourning. No life will be cut off before its time and YAHWEH will always be close at hand. Even the wolf and the lamb will feed together. The Psalm, taken from Isaiah as well, celebrates the coming day of YAHWEH’s salvation before the nations with thanksgiving and joy. He will be powerfully amongst them at last. In the light of the coming of Jesus, St. Paul urges the Thessalonians to not be idle or to suffer idlers. It is the time to work, even to settle down and not be a burden to others. Jesus tells his disciples that terrible times lie ahead for Jerusalem but even that is not the end. False messiahs will arise in a time of great worldwide turmoil and conflict but they are not to be followed. Before all this his followers will be severely persecuted but Jesus will be with them and no ultimate harm will come to them if they are faithful.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Through the prophet Isaiah YAHWEH sets out his coming salvation for Israel in terms of a new heaven and a new earth. It will be so blessed that there will be only joy and delight, no weeping or mourning. No life will be cut off before its time and YAHWEH will always be close at hand. Even the wolf and the lamb will feed together.

Psalm

The Psalm, taken from Isaiah as well, celebrates the coming day of YAHWEH’s salvation before the nations with thanksgiving and joy. He will be powerfully amongst them at last.

New Testament

In the light of the coming of Jesus, St. Paul urges the Thessalonians to not be idle or to suffer idlers. It is the time to work, even to settle down and not be a burden to others.

Gospel

Jesus tells his disciples that terrible times lie ahead for Jerusalem but even that is not the end. False messiahs will arise in a time of great worldwide turmoil and conflict but they are not to be followed. Before all this his followers will be severely persecuted but Jesus will be with them and no ultimate harm will come to them if they are faithful.

Based on the Alternative Readings

The prophet Malachi uses the image of stubble burned in an oven to convey the awful reality of YAHWEH’s coming judgment upon those who persist in evil. On the other hand, those who honour him will experience restoration through the rising of the sun of righteousness. The Psalmist calls for exuberant celebration of the great power of YAHWEH as demonstrated in his decisive lifting up of Israel. The nations bear witness to this miracle and are urged to join in rejoicing along with nature itself. In the light of the coming of Jesus, St. Paul urges the Thessalonians to not be idle or to suffer idlers. It is the time to work, even to settle down and not be a burden to others. Jesus tells his disciples that terrible times lie ahead for Jerusalem but even that is not the end. False messiahs will arise in a time of great worldwide turmoil and conflict but they are not to be followed. Before all this his followers will be severely persecuted but Jesus will be with them and no ultimate harm will come to them if they are faithful.

As Introductions

Old Testament

The prophet Malachi uses the image of stubble burned in an oven to convey the awful reality of YAHWEH’s coming judgment upon those who persist in evil. On the other hand, those who honour him will experience restoration through the rising of the sun of righteousness.

Psalm

The Psalmist calls for exuberant celebration of the great power of YAHWEH as demonstrated in his decisive lifting up of Israel. The nations bear witness to this miracle and are urged to join in rejoicing along with nature itself.

New Testament

In the light of the coming of Jesus, St. Paul urges the Thessalonians to not be idle or to suffer idlers. It is the time to work, even to settle down and not be a burden to others.

Gospel

Jesus tells his disciples that terrible times lie ahead for Jerusalem but even that is not the end. False messiahs will arise in a time of great worldwide turmoil and conflict but they are not to be followed. Before all this his followers will be severely persecuted but Jesus will be with them and no ultimate harm will come to them if they are faithful.

 

Readings for November 6, 2016 Year C Proper 27 (32)

Please see How to Use this Blog

 

First Reading and Psalm

  • Haggai 1:15b-2:9
  • Psalm 145:1-5, 17-21

Second Reading

  • 2 Thessalonians 2:1-5, 13-17

Gospel

  • Luke 20:27-38

Alternative Psalm for above Readings

  • Psalm 98

Alternative First Reading and Psalm

  • Job 19:23-27a
  • Psalm 17:1-9

Full lections can be read here.

Connection Based on the Readings as Set

Haggai is given the word of YAHWEH for the people of Judah who have returned to the Holy Land from exile. They have found their temple in ruins and are assured that it will rise again. In fact its splendor will be greater than Solomon’s temple, filled with the wealth of the nations as YAHWEH continues to dwell among them. In the Psalm the nation is called to meditate on the unsurpassed splendor of YAHWEH who blesses the faithful and destroys the wicked. All flesh will someday come to worship him. To the church in Thessalonica, concerned about the second coming of Jesus and being gathered to him, St. Paul assures them that this glorious event still lies ahead of them. Present and future circumstances not withstanding, their current experience of the love and grace of God in Christ is the first fruit of this coming salvation. In the Gospel Luke tells of Jesus’ encounter with the Sadducees who tried to make belief in the resurrection seem ridiculous by telling the story of the widow who married seven brothers in succession. “Whose wife will she be in the resurrection?” they demand. In response Jesus affirms the resurrection but teaches that it is a reality that will gloriously transcend our experience of this world. He also argues that the Old Testament witnesses to the resurrection in its characterization of YAHWEH as the present God of the ancient patriarchs.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Haggai is given the word of YAHWEH for the people of Judah who have returned to the Holy Land from exile. They have found their temple in ruins and are assured that it will rise again. In fact its splendor will be greater than Solomon’s temple, filled with the wealth of the nations as YAHWEH continues to dwell among them.

Psalm

In the Psalm the nation is called to meditate on the unsurpassed splendor of YAHWEH who blesses the faithful and destroys the wicked. All flesh will someday come to worship him.

New Testament

To the church in Thessalonica, concerned about the second coming of Jesus and being gathered to him, St. Paul assures them that this glorious event still lies ahead of them. Present and future circumstances not withstanding, their current experience of the love and grace of God in Christ is the first fruit of this coming salvation.

Gospel

In the Gospel Luke tells of Jesus’ encounter with the Sadducees who tried to make belief in the resurrection seem ridiculous by telling the story of the widow who married seven brothers in succession. “Whose wife will she be in the resurrection?” they demand. In response Jesus affirms the resurrection but teaches that it is a reality that will gloriously transcend our experience of this world. He also argues that the Old Testament witnesses to the resurrection in its characterization of YAHWEH as the present God of the ancient patriarchs.

Connection Based on the Readings as Set but with Alternative Psalm

Haggai is given the word of YAHWEH for the people of Judah who have returned to the Holy Land from exile. They have found their temple in ruins and are assured that it will rise again. In fact its splendor will be greater than Solomon’s temple, filled with the wealth of the nations as YAHWEH continues to dwell among them. The Psalmist calls for exuberant celebration of the great power of YAHWEH as demonstrated in his decisive lifting up of Israel. The nations bear witness to this miracle and are urged to join in rejoicing along with nature itself. To the church in Thessalonica, concerned about the second coming of Jesus and being gathered to him, St. Paul assures them that this glorious event still lies ahead of them. Present and future circumstances not withstanding, their current experience of the love and grace of God in Christ is the first fruit of this coming great salvation. In the Gospel Luke tells of Jesus’ encounter with the Sadducees who tried to make belief in the resurrection seem ridiculous by telling the story of the widow who married seven brothers in succession. “Whose wife will she be in the resurrection?” they demand. In response Jesus affirms the resurrection but teaches that it is a reality that will powerfully transcend our experience of this world. He also argues that the Old Testament witnesses to the resurrection in its characterization of YAHWEH as still the God of the ancient patriarchs.

As Introductions

Old Testament

Haggai is given the word of YAHWEH for the people of Judah who have returned to the Holy Land from exile. They have found their temple in ruins and are assured that it will rise again. In fact its splendor will be greater than Solomon’s temple, filled with the wealth of the nations as YAHWEH continues to dwell among them.

Psalm

The Psalmist calls for exuberant celebration of the great power of YAHWEH as demonstrated in his decisive lifting up of Israel. The nations bear witness to this miracle and are urged to join in rejoicing along with nature itself.

New Testament

To the church in Thessalonica, concerned about the second coming of Jesus and being gathered to him, St. Paul assures them that this glorious event still lies ahead of them. Present and future circumstances not withstanding, their current experience of the love and grace of God in Christ is the first fruit of this coming great salvation.

Gospel

In the Gospel Luke tells of Jesus’ encounter with the Sadducees who tried to make belief in the resurrection seem ridiculous by telling the story of the widow who married seven brothers in succession. “Whose wife will she be in the resurrection?” they demand. In response Jesus affirms the resurrection but teaches that it is a reality that will gloriously transcend our experience of this world. He also argues that the Old Testament witnesses to the resurrection in its characterization of YAHWEH as the present God of the ancient patriarchs.

Connection Based on Alternative Readings

In this remarkable passage Job cries out for a pen so that his words can be recorded for posterity. In spite of his great suffering he is confident of his ultimate vindication and that in his own flesh he shall see God even long after he has died and his body destroyed. The Psalmist sees himself as a besieged innocent and cries out to YAHWEH for vindication. He is confident of being heard and ultimately finding refuge under the shadow of God’s wing. To the church in Thessalonica, concerned about the second coming of Jesus and being gathered to him, St. Paul assures them that this glorious event still lies ahead of them. Present and future circumstances not withstanding, their current experience of the love and grace of God in Christ is the first fruit of this coming great salvation. In the Gospel Luke tells of Jesus’ encounter with the Sadducees who tried to make belief in the resurrection seem ridiculous by telling the story of the widow who married seven brothers in succession. “Whose wife will she be in the resurrection?” they demand. In response Jesus affirms the resurrection but teaches that it is a reality that will powerfully transcend our experience of this world. He also argues that the Old Testament witnesses to the resurrection in its characterization of YAHWEH as still the God of the ancient patriarchs.

As Introductions

Old Testament

In this remarkable passage Job cries out for a pen so that his words can be recorded for posterity. In spite of his great suffering he is confident of his ultimate vindication and that in his own flesh he shall see God even long after he has died and his body destroyed.

Psalm

The Psalmist sees himself as a besieged innocent and cries out to YAHWEH for vindication. He is confident of being heard and ultimately finding refuge under the shadow of God’s wing.

New Testament

To the church in Thessalonica, concerned about the second coming of Jesus and being gathered to him, St. Paul assures them that this glorious event still lies ahead of them. Present and future circumstances not withstanding, their current experience of the love and grace of God in Christ is the first fruit of this coming great salvation.

Gospel

In the Gospel Luke tells of Jesus’ encounter with the Sadducees who tried to make belief in the resurrection seem ridiculous by telling the story of the widow who married seven brothers in succession. “Whose wife will she be in the resurrection?” they demand. In response Jesus affirms the resurrection but teaches that it is a reality that will gloriously transcend our experience of this world. He also argues that the Old Testament witnesses to the resurrection in its characterization of YAHWEH as the present God of the ancient patriarchs.